Veterinary and Pet Services
Up-to-date veterinary news, events, industry standards and information in the Australian Veterinary industry from vets, animal experts, professionals and associations on Top4 News.
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A Little River animal centre is saving endangered species

A Little River animal centre is saving endangered species | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

“Australia has the worst rate of animal extinction in the world,” Annette Rypalski says. “We lost more animals in the past 200 years in Australia than the whole world lost in the past 500 years.”


So thank heavens for Annette and the team at the Mt Rothwell Conservation and Research Centre at Little River, west of Melbourne.


At Mt Rothwell, a 490ha slice of land has been secured by 11km of fencing, making it the largest predator-free ecosystem in Victoria, with not a cat or fox to be found. Inside that protected zone, staff and volunteers are preserving and breeding some of Australia’s most critically endangered species.

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Vet explores life after racing for Australian thoroughbreds

Vet explores life after racing for Australian thoroughbreds | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

A study that followed more than 4000 thoroughbred foals born in the Australian state of Victoria has detailed what became of the animals after their racing careers.


The research was carried out by Melbourne-based veterinarian Dr Meredith Flash, who wanted to find out more about thoroughbred horses and what happened to them once they left the racing industry.


“Equine vets care about the health and welfare of horses so it was important to look at how many of the horses bred each year go on to race, and where they go when leaving the thoroughbred breeding and racing industries,” said Flash, who is an executive member of the industry body, Equine Veterinarians Australia.

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Australia to develop guidelines for antibiotic use in horses and livestock

Australia to develop guidelines for antibiotic use in horses and livestock | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

Guidelines for the prescribing of antibiotics in horses and livestock will be developed in Australia over the next three years.


The Australian Veterinary Association and Animal Medicines Australia are joining forces to develop the best-practice antibiotic prescribing guidelines. They will help preserve the effectiveness of antimicrobial medicines.


Australian Veterinary Association chief executive Graham Catt said veterinarians were an important partner in designing and implementing antimicrobial stewardship policies.

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Vet Schools in Bed with Pet Food Companies

Vet Schools in Bed with Pet Food Companies | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

Alexi Polden investigates the hand that feeds the nation's leading veterinary schools.


Serious questions are being raised about a cosy relationship between many pet food manufacturers and many of Australia’s leading veterinary schools.


Only weeks out from exams Honi can reveal a particularly worrying example at the University of Sydney’s Veterinary School. In 2015 the nutrition portion of the third year Small Animal Medicine and Therapeutics I subject was presented by Hill’s Pet Nutrition’s (maker of Hill’s Science Diet, among other pet foods), Dr Penny Dobson. Dobson taught two lectures and one tutorial over the course, which covers many areas of small animal health.

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Study Shows Australians Love Spending Money On Their Pets

Study Shows Australians Love Spending Money On Their Pets | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

Over half of all Australian households have pets, so it comes as no surprise that we also love spending money on them. Seeing as owning pets is a scientifically proven method of de-stressing, it just makes sense. A recent report commissioned by RaboBank found that when the going gets tough, pet owners would rather spend less on essentials like electricity and groceries than reducing spending on their precious pets. Almost half of all pet owners ranked having an animal companion to be more important to their well being than having a social life.


In a country where 53 per cent of households have an animal at home, the most important question as always is: cats or dogs? Sorry cat people, but the dogs win out in Australia. Dogs come in as the most popular pet at 68 per cent ownership, with cats following behind at 49 per cent. Fish and birds come a lot further behind at 18 and 17 per cent respectively. Less popular pets include horses and reptiles, each with 2 per cent.

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Earlier desexing of cats could reduce number of euthanased kittens

Earlier desexing of cats could reduce number of euthanased kittens | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it
Veterinary researchers say a national rethink on the age cats are desexed could have an impact on the number of kittens being put down in shelters every year, as well as the number of stray cats.


They have conducted an Australian first study that shows cats can be desexed safely within the first three months of their lives.

Traditionally cats are desexed at around six months of age but can fall pregnant from just three months of age.


One female cat can have up to 40 kittens a year leaving little wonder why 100,000 cats are taken to animal shelters around Australian annually.


The outcome for most cats and kittens in pounds and shelters is euthanasia.

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Snakes attack: Record numbers of dogs and cats bitten in Melbourne serpent surge

Snakes attack: Record numbers of dogs and cats bitten in Melbourne serpent surge | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it
Pet owners are being warned to take extra care of their animals with a record number of cats and dogs being bitten as the warmer Melbourne weather brings more snakes than usual into the suburbs.


The unusually warm October weather is definitely drawing out the venomous snakes and they're coming closer to the suburbs.


Pet owners are being warned to walk dogs on leads, especially near long grass and water, and keep their yards mowed and free of clutter.

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Regeneus clinches major animal health partner as dog treatment develops

Regeneus clinches major animal health partner as dog treatment develops | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it
Regeneus has partnered with a global Top-5 animal health company to commercialise a proprietary canine stem cell therapy targeting a US$500 million per annum market.


The partnership will further develop Regeneus’ off-the-shelf CryoShot Canine product, an allogeneic stem cell therapy for dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) and musculoskeletal conditions that has undergone extensive successful field trials in Australia.

Under the terms of the agreement, the animal health partner will jointly fund a pre-pivotal study assessing CryoShot as a treatment for canine osteoarthritis in consideration for an exclusive option to develop and commercialise CryoShot.

Osteoarthritis is the dominant musculoskeletal condition in dogs and is associated with pain and degeneration of joint tissues.

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Pet killers growing in your garden

Pet killers growing in your garden | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

Most pets know instinctively which plants and foods to avoid but sometimes, if a treat is preferred by their owner, they’ll give it a shot just to please them.


Many plants which can harm pets are quite common in the wild and flourish in home gardens.


Some plants will cause allergies just through contact.


Ingestion of certain flowers, fruits and plants can cause toxicity in pets with symptoms ranging from vomiting, diarrhea, acute renal or cardiac failure and even intestinal obstructions.


Particularly dangerous for dogs (especially puppies) is brunfelsia, often called “yesterday, today and tomorrow” because its flowers gradually change from violet to lilac to white.


If dogs ingest the plant, especially the fruit which follows flowering, it can be lethal.

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Paws for thought as pets get special treatment - Star Weekly

Paws for thought as pets get special treatment - Star Weekly | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it
More than 200 dog lovers and their four-legged friends will be out for a stroll at Paws in the Park next week.


Paws in the Park typically draws about 250 participants and their pets to the family event, which kicks off at Gisborne Veterinary Clinic on November 8.


Practice manager Travis Grieve says the event has grown substantially in nine years. “Paws in the Park started in October 2006 with about 80 participants and their dogs turning up for the morning,” he said.


“The initial reasoning in setting the event up was to help promote correct pet health in the Macedon Ranges shire and raise funds for the various not-for-profit organisations.


“Over the past 10 years, the event has been organised by the Gisborne Veterinary Clinic’s staff, with many local businesses donating their time or products for various aspects of the walk,” Mr Grieve said.


The day’s activities will include information stalls set up by the Macedon Ranges Wildlife Network and Seeing Eye Dogs Australia, pet photo booths, raffles, entertainment and food.


Dental checks and nail trimming will also be offered by vets from the Gisborne clinic for a gold coin donation. Mr Grieve said Paws in the Park had raised as much as $22,000 in the past.


“The ultimate goal for the future of this event is to grow the day, to incorporate many different aspects of the human-animal bond,” Mr Grieve said. “And also create a platform for promoting best animal care and awareness of the plight of wildlife surrounding our communities.”


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Mandatory vaccination lead into drug overdose

Mandatory vaccination lead into drug overdose | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

Jim Pearce, Member for Mirani, had been approached by horse owners with confusion and disappointment regarding to Hendra vaccantions for horses and accusations of stand over attitude by strakeholders.


"There are numerous reports of mounting casualties from this over vaccination- including adverse effects on performance horses and even the deaths of some valuable horses." he said.


Jim Pearce is puzzled by this discpline of the horse sports to give a mandatory vaccination as a condition to be able to join the competitions. Also, for the everyday veterinarian care of other horses while others don't need to do so.


They also applied different set of vaccination for different groups. There are arguements of big players pressuring the horse owners to have a mandatory vaccination every 6 months or they'll lack on veterinarian care for their horses. But according to authorities, they did not require a mandatory Hendra vaccinations.

Top4's insight:

It's not bad to do a mandatory vaccination but you need to have professional consultation before going to do so. Vaccinations are considered as virus, so if it's too many, then the body won't keep up.

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Electronic collars are NO good

Electronic collars are NO good | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

It is nature of dogs to bark at someone or something if it will be harmful to its owner or it's stepping on its property. So we must have the effort to train them.


According to Australian Veterinary Association (AVA), electronic collars are not a good idea if you want to stop the dog from barking and it could possibly worsen its case in behavioural problem.


"These collars may be referred to as e collars, shock or static collars, and owners may be advised to use them as a quick fix to barking problems.


"But make no mistake - these collars inflict pain, can cause friction sores and inflammation around the neck and will lead to more fearful, anxious and aggressive behaviour." AVA spokesperson Dr. Katrina Ward, president of AVA's behaviour group, said.

Top4's insight:

We must not resort to electronic collar, this can only do harm to the dogs especially it will only increase their behavioral problems. If you were in their shoes, will you like a electronic collar on your neck? And a possibility to harm you eventhough you're not doing anything? The answers "No", of course, right? There's no "quick fix" when having a pet, it's a matter of giving love, patience and discipline.

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Vets warn of dangerous toxins in pet flea spray sold at Woolworths and Coles

Vets warn of dangerous toxins in pet flea spray sold at Woolworths and Coles | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

Angry pet owners have called on Coles and Woolworths to stop stocking a brand of flea spray which is potentially lethal to cats.


Exelpet Fleaban, a flea spray for cats and dogs, contains pyrethrins, an insecticidal substance produced from the Chrysanthemum cineraiaefolium flower that is toxic to cats at high concentrations.


Chris Chambel says his 10-month-old cat Sasha started “foaming at the mouth” just seconds after he applied Exelpet. He only found out from his vet afterwards that pyrethrins can be highly toxic to cats in high doses.

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The easy way to stop cats breeding like rabbits

The easy way to stop cats breeding like rabbits | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

When pet cats fall pregnant at a young age, they are not the only ones to have kittens; their owners are often dismayed to discover a litter is on its way.


"They think the cat is just getting bigger because they're getting older," said Kristina Vesk, chief executive of the Cat Protection Society of NSW. "[They] are so utterly surprised, saying, 'This can't be, our cat is only a kitten'. It's people just honestly not knowing their cat can get pregnant so young."


Cats are usually desexed at five to six months of age but sexually precocious females come into heat as young as four months. Now, Australian-first research at the University of Sydney has found cats can safely be desexed before two months, preventing unwanted pregnancies and reducing the number of stray and feral cats threatening native species.

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Vet profession compromised by 'commercialisation' of industry

Vet profession compromised by 'commercialisation' of industry | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

A leading veterinarian warns his profession is being compromised by the pet food and animal pharmaceuticals industries.


Richard Malik has been a vet for 34 years and is recognised as one of Australia's leading cat specialists.


He has made a formal complaint to the highest veterinary board in New South Wales, calling for the profession to distance itself from the global pet care industry.


"We're on this slippery slope of influence that pervades the things we do, and it shouldn't happen," Dr Malik told 7.30.

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SA's new pet desexing laws may put 'puppies at risk': dog attacks rising

SA's new pet desexing laws may put 'puppies at risk': dog attacks rising | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

The health of newborn puppies could be put at risk under South Australia's proposed compulsory desexing laws, the Australian Veterinary Association says.


The South Australian Government is introducing legislation making it compulsory for dogs and cats to be neutered at point of sale.


The change originated after a citizen's jury found more needed to be done to reduce the number of animals being euthanased every year. In South Australia puppies can be legally sold from seven weeks of age.

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Pets paying the price of a hard QLD rental market

Pets paying the price of a hard QLD rental market | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it
Pet owners are having a hard time renting in south east Queensland, but real estate agents say they often offer landlords other advantages.


Renters in south east Queensland are increasingly giving up their pets to secure rental properties in a growing competitive housing market.

A recent statement by the Real Estate Institute of Queensland (REIQ) revealed the Gold and Sunshine coasts were experiencing some of the weakest vacancy rates in the state.


Animal Welfare League Queensland spokesperson Zoe Hermans said the current housing market is the biggest reason Queenslanders are surrendering their pets.

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Canine and feline blood donors needed

Canine and feline blood donors needed | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it
RUSTY is giving a helping paw to his fellow canines by donating blood.


The generous pet has joined the donor program at Mosman Vet and the team is appealing for new dogs to sign up.


The surgery had several local dogs on the program, but once they marked their seventh birthday they had to retire from giving blood.


The dogs need to be a large breed weighing more than 25kg and they must also be desexed and have an easy temperament.

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Vets save near-death dog, 12 hours after snake bite

Vets save near-death dog, 12 hours after snake bite | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it
IT WAS a heart wrenching moment for Louise Craig when she discovered her beloved pooch Baz lying in a pool of saliva, frozen from motion.


The only thing he could move was his wagging tail, in an effort to show his owners he was still alive. Roughly 12 hours prior to being found, he was bitten by a brown snake.


Baz was admitted to Valley Vet Surgery, and three hours later he required ventilation to stay alive. Senior Veterinarian Kim McPherson said he was on the brink of death.


Ms McPherson encouraged owners to keep an eye out for "abnormal" behaviour, and seek advice from their vet if they notice anything strange.


Baz has fully recovered, and the only thing to have changed is how "sooky" he has become, Ms Craig said. Her message to other owners: be aware of the whereabouts of your pet.


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Brisbane vet warns against bird owners breeding their pets

Brisbane vet warns against bird owners breeding their pets | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

THESE Cockatiel babies may be cute, but a local vet nurse has warned bird owners these little critters can be a lot of work and trouble.


Madeline Rienecker from Brisbane Bird and Exotics Veterinary (BBEV) said many bird owners want to see a full life cycle, and while it seems like a good idea to breed their birds, it requires a lot of education.


“It sounds like a great idea but it’s a lot of work and is quite expensive to do it properly, and while they are adorable there is a lot that can go wrong and they usually end up at the vet,” she said.


“In some cases the parents don’t recognise the babies and they can attack them, or they don’t know how to feed the babies — people don’t realise how much work is involved and the potential risks for mum and baby.”


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Vet Schools in Bed with Pet Food Companies

Vet Schools in Bed with Pet Food Companies | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

Serious questions are being raised about a cosy relationship between many pet food manufacturers and many of Australia’s leading veterinary schools.


Only weeks out from exams Honi can reveal a particularly worrying example at the University of Sydney’s Veterinary School. In 2015 the nutrition portion of the third year Small Animal Medicine and Therapeutics I subject was presented by Hill’s Pet Nutrition’s (maker of Hill’s Science Diet, among other pet foods), Dr Penny Dobson. Dobson taught two lectures and one tutorial over the course, which covers many areas of small animal health.


This has occurred while the University of Sydney, and many other leading universities, have allowed pet food manufacturers to advertise extensively throughout their facilities, directly to students. This association is not hidden, the University of Sydney’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital’s website boasts its close association with Hill’s on its website.


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Pregnancy testing rules on exporting live cattles being reviewed in NT

Pregnancy testing rules on exporting live cattles being reviewed in NT | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

All exporting cows are needed to get pregnancy test before being shipped to find out if they are bearing a calf or not. At present, non-veterinarians in NT are allowed to carry-out the pregnancy test if they are trained by professionals.


"If our accreditation process isn't completely robust and it leads to pregnant export cows being certified as non-pregnant, then it will risk damaging the Northern Territory and Australia's export trade credibility. It also risks allowing pregnant cows to enter the live export chain and potentially leading to animal welfare issues." stated by DPI chief veterinary officer Malcolm Anderson.


One hundred (100) non-veterinarians are capable to the pregnancy test on cows in NT. According to Mr. Anderson, NT and WA are the only ones that are allowed to do the tests eventhough you're not a veterinarian since they are more isolated and accesibility of veterinarian are limited.


THe DPI predicted that the review results will be done on December and announce any further instructions by the end of the year.

Top4's insight:

Hopefully, this will run smoothly. This can eventually help in observing our export trade rate and improving our economic growth.

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Your pet might be at risk by buying online medication

Your pet might be at risk by buying online medication | Veterinary and Pet Services | Scoop.it

It is indeed that buying online is convenient, but how can you be so sure that is it safe?


According to Dr. Robert Johnson, AVA President, drugs that can be bought online could be substandard or counterfeit products that are very unsafe to your pet or worst, your pet's life will be on the line.


"Quality and safety can't necessarily be assured if veterinary medicines are bought from overseas or through unknown internet pharmacies. Australia has strict controls for the manufacture and regulation of veterinary medicines to ensure these medicines are safe for pets when used in accordance with the instruction on the label," he said.


The World Health Organization (WHO) said that 50% of the medicines acquired from the internet are more or less illegal sites that their physical address are considered to be unknown.


So be careful on ordering online, make sure it is a trusted site and with a real deal of address.

Top4's insight:

Let's take into action and never let the "convenience" run through you. Any medicine or drug can affect one's health, make sure to buy only on authorized stores to keep your pets from harm.

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